College of Business: University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

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Proud Moment


3/9/2010

by Dana Howard

Walking out of BIF after a late night of preparation for an upcoming case competition, Casey Ryan, Michelle Fasano, Roxanne Miller, and Chris Liquin stumbled upon a thick stack of 20-dollar bills adding up to $2,000.

“Within seconds, Michelle was on the phone with the police department, and within the half hour, we met with the police and returned the money,” Liquin said.

Finding $2,000 isn't just like finding a quarter on the ground and silently thanking someone for the extra meter money. Finding $2,000 is a test of character, one that was passed by this small group of freshman and sophomores from the College of Business.

John Hedeman, Assistant Dean of Honors in the College of Business, said that the students “lived up to the highest standards of leadership and professional responsibility.” He also stated that with students living up to standards like these, the College of Business graduates will have a positive impact on society.

Returning the money was the right thing to do, but it wasn't easy right away to just dismiss keeping it. Liquin said it would have been nice to have the extra spending money, but it's even better to be able to feel proud about a decision he made in a compromising situation.

Liquin added that although he's only been at the University for a semester, he's already realized the emphasis the College of Business puts on professional responsibility and ethical standards.

“You can't teach people to be ethically responsible, but by attracting people who have high moral standards of their own, the College of Business has done an excellent job of enrolling students who are able to make responsible decisions like these,” said Liquin.

Assistant Dean Hedeman agrees: “With the emphasis on professional responsibility in the College of Business, I would hope all business students would turn over the money to the police.”

These standards emphasized by the College of Business helped return the $2,000 to its rightful owner: a Big 10 wrestling coach who attended a wrestling meet nearby that same evening.

In the end, those who don't think college students have the moral standards or will power to say "no" to $2,000 were proved wrong by four unsuspecting College of Business students willing to do the right thing simply because they should.

UIUC College of Business