Working Papers Home


2014 Working Papers
2013 Working Papers
2012 Working Papers
2011 Working Papers
2010 Working Papers
2009 Working Papers
2008 Working Papers
2007 Working Papers
2006 Working Papers
2005 Working Papers
2004 Working Papers
2003 Working Papers
2002 Working Papers
2001 Working Papers
2000 Working Papers


Search All Papers


JEL Classification


Past Working Papers (Prior to 2000)


Office of Research
Home Page



Information on
Submitting a Paper



 
 
"The Discourse of Management and the Management of Discourse"

Bertram C. Bruce, Jeanne M. Connell, Chris Higgins, and Joseph T. Mahoney

 

First Author :

Bertram C. Bruce
Graduate School Library and Information Science
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
501 E. Daniel
303 LIS
Champaign, IL 61820
USA

217-244-3576

chip@illinois.edu


Second Author :

Jeanne M. Connell
Education Policy, Organization and Leadership
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, College of Education
1310 South Sixth Street
375 Education Building
Champaign, IL 61820
USA

217-333-7328

jmconnel@illinois.edu


Third Author :

Chris Higgins
Education Policy, Organization and Leadership
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, College of Education
1310 South Sixth Street
351 Education Building
Champaign, IL 61820
USA

217-244-9191

crh4@illinois.edu


Fourth Author :

Joseph T. Mahoney
Business Administration
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, College of Business
1206 South Sixth Street
140C Wohlers Hall
Champaign, IL 61820
USA

217-244-8257

josephm@illinois.edu

http://www.business.uiuc.edu/faculty/mahoney.html

 
 
Abstract :
 
Discourse is a pervasive tool of management; one might even say that discourse is what managers do. A widespread assumption among managers is that discourse is not only a pervasive tool, but an effective one for precise communication of information, for making decisions, and for enlisting action, essentially a transmission tool. This paper maintains that the transmission view is a limited conception of language use, one which leads to a faulty conception of what managers do. It ignores the need for an ethics of communication and misjudges the creative aspects of language use. Management discourse is a far more complex and fluid phenomenon, one requiring not just effective use, but management itself. In other words consideration of the discourse of management leads us to the need for the management of discourse.
 
 
Manuscript Received : 2011
Manuscript Published : 2011
 
 
This abstract has been viewed 601 times.
Click here to view the full text of this paper.